Statistics

Each day, women spend 200 million hours collecting water for their families. This lost productivity is greater than the combined number of hours worked in a week by employees at Walmart, United Parcel Service, McDonald’s, IBM, Target, and Kroger.
(Source: www.water.org, WHO/UNICEF and WSP)

11 percent more girls attend school when sanitation is available.
(Source: www.water.org, WHO)

Around 1.1 billion people globally do not have access to improved water supply sources whereas 2.4 billion people do not have access to any type of improved sanitation facility. About 2 million people die every year due to diarrhoeal diseases, most of them are children less than 5 years of age. The most affected are the populations in developing countries, living in extreme conditions of poverty, normally peri-urban dwellers or rural inhabitants.
(Source: World Health Organization)

Diarrhoeal disease alone amounts to an estimated 4.1 % of the total DALY global burden of disease and is responsible for the deaths of 1.8 million people every year (WHO, 2004). It was estimated that 88% of that burden is attributable to unsafe water supply, sanitation and hygiene and is mostly concentrated on children in developing countries.
(Source: World Health Organization)

A significant amount of disease could be prevented especially in developing countries through better access to safe water supply, adequate sanitation facilities and better hygiene practices.
(Source: World Health Organization)

Every 21 seconds, a child dies from diarrhea. This amounts to approximately 4,100 deaths a day. (Source: www.water.org)

Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death among children under five in the world. (Source: www.water.org)

Around 1.5 million deaths each year – nearly one in five – are caused by diarrhea. It kills more children than malaria, AIDS, and measles combined. (Source: www.water.org)

Malnutrition, due to dirty water, inadequate sanitation, and hygiene, is estimated to lead to death in an additional 2,350 children under the age of five each day. (Source: www.water.org)

3.41 million people die each year from water, sanitation and hygiene-related causes each year. (Source: www.water.org)

780 million people lack access to an improved water source; approximately one in nine people. (Source: www.water.org)

The water and sanitation crisis claims more lives through disease than any war claims through guns. (Source: www.water.org)

Half of the hospital beds in the world are occupied by patients suffering from diseases associated with lack of access to safe drinking water, inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene. (Source: www.water.org)

Each day, women spend 200 million hours collecting water for their families. This lost productivity is greater than the combined number of hours worked in a week by employees at Wal-Mart, United Parcel Service, McDonald’s, IBM, Target, and Kroger. 
(Source: www.water.org, WHO/UNICEF and WSP)

11 percent more girls attend school when sanitation is available. 
(Source: www.water.org, WHO)

Around 1.1 billion people globally do not have access to improved water supply sources whereas 2.4 billion people do not have access to any type of improved sanitation facility. About 2 million people die every year due to diarrhoeal diseases; most of them are children less than 5 years of age. The most affected are the populations in developing countries, living in extreme conditions of poverty, normally peri-urban dwellers or rural inhabitants. 
(Source: World Health Organization)

Diarrhoeal disease alone amounts to an estimated 4.1 % of the total DALY global burden of disease and is responsible for the deaths of 1.8 million people every year (WHO, 2004). It was estimated that 88% of that burden is attributable to unsafe water supply, sanitation and hygiene and is mostly concentrated on children in developing countries. 
(Source: World Health Organization)

A significant amount of disease could be prevented especially in developing countries through better access to safe water supply, adequate sanitation facilities and better hygiene practices. 
(Source: World Health Organization)